Post Archive by Month: May,2016

State Reform Roundup

This is part of a series examining ethics, transparency and campaign finance proposals in the states.  It’s an all-too-common refrain in politics: when Congress can’t pass legislation, the states take command of the issue and create solutions on their own. Campaign finance reform is no exception. A number of states have upcoming bipartisan ballot initiatives or bills pending in their legislatures

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Reps. Massie and Kaptur Join the Rebellion

Congratulations! You’ve just been elected to Congress! If you want to serve on a good committee, never mind your credentials or your expertise. You better start fundraising. Speaking with the Cincinnati Enquirer, Rep. Thomas Massie (R-KY) has come out swinging with a one-two punch against party fundraising schemes that attempt to price committee seats by requiring large amounts of fundraising

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Paul Ryan: Republicans could do more to fight crony capitalism

House Speaker Paul Ryan, you’re almost there. You said that Republicans hate crony capitalism in an interview with Politico’s Glenn Thrush. You even went one step further and admitted, “Republicans need to do a better job going after crony capitalism.” Heck, you gave a shout-out to democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders! “Cronyism, is in a weird way, what Bernie Sanders

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Our broken campaign finance system in two charts

The Washington Post just explained how broken our campaign finance system is in two charts. For background: in 2014, Congress slipped in a few legal changes to adjust how much the Republican and Democratic parties can raise for the 2016 general election and what they can spend the money on, like legal expenses and the party headquarters (as seen in

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This one cool trick will get you a meeting with the president

It’s another dirty not-so-secret in Washington circles: donate to the charity or foundation of a member of Congress or the president, and it helps your chances to meet them. In a new report, Maplight examines how frequently President Obama invites donors to the Barack Obama Foundation into the White House. Hint: It’s nearly 40 percent of the time (15 of

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A Tale of Two Washingtons

Welcome to Washington, aka a modern tale of two cities. This month’s issue of Washington Life Magazine compares “Old Washington” — one chock-full of deals, politics and personal gain — with “New D.C.” — with a burgeoning startup culture, thriving restaurant scene and more people passionate about fixing their government than seats available at a National’s game. The op-ed was

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Look Who is Right on the Money

Before Donald Trump was for accepting donations from wealthy donors, he was attacking it. But as one Republican said, “If there is one thing that unites both parties up here, it’s money.” Today, we’re launching a new resource called “Right on the Money” to highlight conservative and Republican research, polling and statements from elected officials, thought-leaders and voters about what we believe

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ReFormers to Congress: It is Time to Lead Again

Today, the Minneapolis Star Tribune published an op-ed by Minnesota Governor Arne Carlson (R) and Rep. Gerald Sikorski (D-MN), members of Issue One’s ReFormers Caucus.  The piece highlights the increased scrutiny members of Congress are facing following a 60 Minutes segment about the four hours a day they spend ‘dialing for dollars.’   “How ‘dialing for dollars’ has perverted Congress”   A few lawmakers recently

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Roadmap to a working Congress

The Democracy Fund is out with a new report this week examining why “Congress is broken,” is a common refrain inside and outside Washington. Their premise is that Congress “is failing its obligations to the American people,” and public opinion agrees. Approval ratings of the body, according to Gallup, haven’t risen above 20 percent in more than three years. And

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Read “Why We Left Congress: How the Legislative Branch Is Broken and What We Can Do About It”

Issue One’s new joint report with the R Street Institute examines the legislative branch’s dysfunction through conversations with members who have voluntarily departed in the 2018 cycle. Read the full report and proposed solutions in “Why We Left Congress: How the Legislative Branch is Broken and What We Can Do About Ithere.