Post Archive by Month: December,2017

The numbers behind why the Senate Ethics Committee is a black hole

A recent slew of high-profile cases has brought the U.S. Select Committee on Senate Ethics into the national spotlight. Increased media attention and public scrutiny stemming from cases like Senator Al Franken’s (D-Minn) alleged sexual misconduct against seven women — and the potential for jurisdictional tug-of-war if Republican candidate Roy Moore wins in the Alabama contest — has led to

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Total cost of Alabama’s special Senate contest to exceed $40 million

Update, Dec. 11, 2017: This post has been updated to include campaign finance filings filed with the FEC through Dec. 10. A special U.S. Senate election in deep-red Alabama — where President Donald Trump prevailed over Democrat Hillary Clinton in 2016 by nearly 30 percentage points — has become unexpectedly close, earning tens of millions of dollars in spending, as well

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Nineteen House lawmakers launch first-of-its-kind bipartisan congressional caucus focused on ethics and political reform

Today, 19 bipartisan lawmakers in the U.S. House of Representatives launched the Congressional Reformers Caucus, the first organization of its kind on Capitol Hill to focus exclusively on discussing political reform ideas and legislation. Co-chaired by Rep. Kathleen Rice (D-NY) and Rep. Ken Buck (R-CO), the Caucus aims to address ethics and accountability issues in Congress, as well as the

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More than half of all senators support commonsense bill to save taxpayers money and increase transparency

A bipartisan proposal to save taxpayers money and increase political transparency has passed a new milestone. Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA) has become the 51st sitting senator to sponsor the Senate Campaign Disclosure Parity Act (S. 298), legislation that would require senators and Senate candidates to electronically file their campaign finance reports, something that House candidates and presidential candidates have been

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There’s no reason to relax rules around coordinated expenditures between political parties and candidates. So why is the Senate trying to?

Today, Issue One submitted a letter opposing a provision slipped into a government funding bill (FY2018 Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Bill) that would weaken rules limiting coordination between political parties and candidates. “This provision is a backdoor attempt that would allow more access and influence for deep-pocketed donors at a time when the American people are already frustrated

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