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73% of Americans Call for Corporate Contribution Limits, New Poll Shows

According to the Newseum’s 2015 “State of the First Amendment” survey, Americans firmly support individual liberties. 75% of respondents believe that the First Amendment does not go too far in guaranteeing broad personal rights. There was one issue where voters called for stronger government limits, though. 73% of the poll’s respondents agreed that restrictions on corporate and union contributions in

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The Age of Super PACs

Check out this great video infographic from the New York Times about how candidates and Super PACs get around anti-coordination laws. What’s the solution to this blatant rulebreaking? For starters, the Federal Election Commission could start enforcing the law. You can read more here. Video: The Age of Super PACs

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DC Court Upholds Pay-to-Play Ban

Some great news came out of the courts Tuesday, as the DC Court of Appeals upheld a law barring federal contractors from making contributions in federal elections. The ban, which has been in place since 1940, is designed to prevent a pay-to-play system by which companies can only receive contracts by donating to elected officials. Issue One supports these bans,

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Desperately Seeking Sheldon

Forget Jaime Lannister. In Washington, we have kingmakers, not kingslayers. “You now have the potential of 200 people deciding who ends up being elected president every single time,” President Obama said in 2012, to a room full of wealthy Democratic donors. There are a handful of people with a fistful of dollars who hold incredible power over the electoral landscape.

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IRS to Dark Money Groups: “It’s Open Season.”

The Internal Revenue Service is unlikely to take steps to shine a light on dark money spending in the run-up to the 2016 elections, the New York Times reports today. The result: millions of dollars flooding into politics from shadowy nonprofits that are not required to disclose their donors; said one expert, “it’s going to be pretty much open season.”

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Solutions 101: The Disclosure System We Have Now

Disclosure requirements are varied, complicated, and poorly enforced. That’s a problem, because where there is confusion, subversion and outright disregard for the law abounds. As campaign finance law has mutated and adapted to contemporary conditions, it fragmented, building the splintered disclosure apparatus we have today. Following reforms in the late 1970s, political parties became especially dominant within the campaign finance process. So-called

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Take Action: Twitter Town Hall for a Disclosure Executive Order

By acting today, the president could completely redefine corporate campaign finance disclosure and set a powerful precedent for money in politics reform. A growing group, including Issue One, is calling for the president to sign an executive order that would require companies with federal contracts to disclose campaign spending. The advocacy effort is ramping up. 130 members of Congress signed

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Solutions 101: What is Disclosure?

Disclosure is the foundation of campaign finance regulation. Being able to follow the money in our elections allows the public to hold those who give it and spend it responsible. Money matters – and society should be able to see where it goes. Essentially, disclosure requirements are in place to show who is giving money in politics, whether that money

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Solutions 101: Public Financing for Congressional Elections

In politics, money talks. Two bills recently reintroduced in Congress attempt to give smaller donors a louder voice. The Government By The People Act, crafted by Rep. John Sarbanes (D-Md.), and its partner, the Fair Elections Now Act, from Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), would implement a voluntary public financing system for congressional elections. In a public financing system, candidates receive

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How to Run for President Without Declaring Your Candidacy

The presumed frontrunner for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination had raised millions of dollars, traveled around the country, and given speech after speech about the future of the nation, all before declaring himself a candidate. If you want to cut Jeb Bush’s newly-minted campaign a check, you’ll be bound by current campaign contribution limits to $2,700. Until he formally announced his

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