disclosure

Watchdogs File FCC Complaints Regarding Lack of Disclosure in Most Expensive House Race in History

MEDIA CONTACTS: William Gray, Issue One, wgray@issueone.org; O: 202-204-8553 Corey Goldstone, Campaign Legal Center, cgoldstone@campaignlegalcenter.org, O: 202-856-7912 *** Today, Issue One and Campaign Legal Center (CLC) filed six complaints with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) against two Atlanta-based television stations in the aftermath of the special election in Georgia’s 6th Congressional District, which was the most expensive U.S. House election

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Here’s how President Trump’s Speech Should Have Addressed Draining the Swamp

In his joint address to Congress last night, President Trump laid out a broad agenda, from jobs and health care, to taxes and national security, for change in Washington. However, it failed to address the real culprit behind gridlock in Washington: the undue influence moneyed interests have on decision-making by elected and appointed officials. While the executive order on ethics

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House Passes Bill Requiring Transparency from Presidential Library Donors

This week, the House passed the bipartisan Presidential Library Donation Reform Act, sponsored by Tennessee Republican John Duncan and co-sponsored by Maryland Democrat Elijah Cummings. Under current law, presidential libraries are built with private funds that can be raised in any amount, from any source, including foreign governments or corporations. This has lead to claims of conflict of interest. For

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FEC takes action… after two years

Today, the Federal Election Commission (FEC) fined three so-called “dark money” organizations for violating campaign finance laws by failing disclose the source of funds used for political spending and advertisements. The three groups — the 60 Plus Association, the American Future Fund and Americans for Job Security — are each a part of the Koch brothers’ network of interest groups

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State Reform Roundup

This is part of a series examining ethics, transparency and campaign finance proposals in the states.  It’s an all-too-common refrain in politics: when Congress can’t pass legislation, the states take command of the issue and create solutions on their own. Campaign finance reform is no exception. A number of states have upcoming bipartisan ballot initiatives or bills pending in their legislatures

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Dark Money May Get A Little Brighter

Voters are finally beginning to learn who is funding political campaigns in their states. According to a recent poll conducted by the National Conference of State Legislatures, thirty-eight states are considering new disclosure laws that would require dark money organizations to disclose donors, including one proposed in Arkansas by Representative Clarke Tucker. Dark money groups have become highly influential in

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ReFormers Caucus Marks Buckley Anniversary

On January 30th, Issue One partnered with the U.S. Archives and the U.S. Association of Former Members of Congress (USAFMC) to host a dynamic and robust discussion on the evolution and consequences of money in politics. On the 40th anniversary of Buckley v. Valeo, the case first responsible for conflating money with speech, panelists advocated for a series of reforms

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What’s Happening in the States? February 2016 Edition

Although we’ve reached the cold months of winter, states and municipalities have stayed hot in their fight to reduce the influence of money in politics. Here are the reform fights we’re keeping an eye on in 2016: In Arkansas, advocates are gathering signatures to put  a money in politics reform initiative on the ballot. The ballot initiative  would revamp disclosure

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ReFormer Jim Leach Stresses Voter Value before Caucus

Former Republican Congressman and ReFormer Caucus member Jim Leach appeared on Sioux City’s NBC’s affiliate KITV last Friday to address how skyrocketing campaign spending has distorted the process in the Iowa caucuses. In addition, he advocated for increased disclosure on political spending in his home state because, “If you were to ask a typical Iowan who pays for these ads,

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